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20120925
20121003
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
will challenge chancellor merkel in the 2015 election. >> the french government unveils steep tax hikes on businesses and the country's wealthy as it seeks to cut the nation's budget deficit. >> in formula one, team mercedes is not going to renew michael schumacher's contract after the season is over. german chancellor angela merkel will have a formidable challenger when she seeks reelection next year. it has been announced that former finance minister peer steinbruck will be running to oppose her. >> is a sharp-witted and sharp- tongued opponent. his candidacy was announced earlier today in berlin. >> he is the spd star right now after the two other contenders made way for him. the parliamentary leader refused to run a second time, and party leader did not think he would attract enough votes, so steinbruck is said to compete against his onetime ally angela merkel for the chancellorship. >> i accept the challenge to take the spd to victory in the next election. that is our goal. we want to oust this government. >> steinbruck says he wants to head a social democrat green coalition. he ha
the spd to victory in the next election. that is our goal. we want to oust this government. >> steinbruck says he wants to head a social democrat green coalition. he has a degree in economics and is known for pragmatism and expertise in fiscal policy. he is regarded as a centrist, and the spd hopes he can pull votes from conservatives. am i think they have a better chance with him. he seems more down to earth -- >> i think they have a better chance with him than with gabriel. he seems more down to earth. >> he can do a lot. he understands a lot. but he also does not come across so well. >> i'm not sure if he will do well against mrs. merkel. she is doing a great job. >> for the spd, a tough decision is now out of the way, and the real race has just begun. >> is the former finance minister chancellor material? for some insight, let's turn to our political correspondent. peter, what was his main message at the news conference today? >> the main message was that he wants an outright victory in next autumn's election. he does not want to just press social democrats to do better than last time
the opposition an edge, but the government claims it will retain its majority. >> opposition supporters have taken to the streets to celebrate victory. georgians went to the polls against a backdrop of prison abuse, a scandal that has damaged the once-popular government of mikhail saakashvili. his name rivals -- his main rival was to move the country into russia. it is not clear when the outcome will be known. let's go live to our reporter following the ballot in georgia. some confusion about the outcome, with both major groups claiming victory. do you have any further details? >> these elections have been a close race from the beginning. what we now hear from tbilisi, is that these elections obviously have turned out to become a victory for the opposition. the opposition -- the ballots showed that -- the exit polls showed that opposition leaders -- the opposition led by the oligarch who is accompanied with the president of georgia. >> is at stake? will this determine the future of the country -- >> what is at stake? will this determine the future of the country? >> this parliament will beco
of government since the collapse of the soviet union more than 20 years it. >> president mikheil saakashvili will stay in office, but his party has lost parliamentary elections to the opposition party, the georgian dream. now you'll have to get along with a new prime minister who ran a bitter campaign against him. >> batman is a once elusive millionaire who only wanted to politics last year. we will find out more about hamper our correspondent in moscow in just a moment. first, this report. >> it georgians will cut to the prospect of a new parliament. it's the first time since independence that an election rather than a revolution has led to the transfer of power. >> i expect improvements and laws so that children will be happy. i don't know how he will behave and what he will do for the people, but i see the people are hopeful. >> we expect things to get better. expect new things. the whole population is in a good mood. people meet each other and kiss each other. >> he swept to power in 2004 but faces accusations of but the rates vary and rule. his party will no longer control parliament. >
. the government and military haare capitalizing on the shift in mood. almost two decades of autocratic rule by the president of belarus is set to continue following sunday's parliamentary elections. >> but, according to western observers, the government was returned to power by a poll that was neither free nor fair. the government in minsk has dismissed the criticism and opposition's boycott of the vote as well. >> as the central election commission announced its bolt -- its results, one member said, ironically, it seems that opposition parties do not enjoy the trust of their electorate. at monday morning's press conference, the commission was quick to quash talk of low voter turnout. >> the elections were valid in all prisons throughout the republic of belarus -- in all precincts throughout the republic of belarus. i would say voter turnout was more than 70% total. >> however, opposition leaders are skeptical that so many people turned up at the polls. they have called for a boycott, saying that election officials would make sure that the president remained in power. >> these elections wer
. the japanese government is developing alliances with the philippines, vietnam, and other countries. those countries are also concerned with china's expansion. noda's speech is seen as reinforcing that policy. >> so what's the future of relations between japan and china and between japan and south korea? >> there is little hope though -- will continue. his china counterpart met in new york on tuesday on the sidelines of the u.n. general assembly. dealing with the issue. they said two countries should retain a broader perspective. but the chinese stood by their previous insistence that the islands are chinese territory. japanese government officials say china is expected to continue provocative activities near the islands for some time. japan is also hoping to have a foreign minister meeting with south korea in new york. but many observers say if the two ministers meet they are likely only to reiterate their positions without making progress on the territorial dispute. so it appears little will be the result for the time being and the noda administration is expected to face further difficul
, and the spanish government has unveiled a tough austerity budget for 2013. it foresees tax hikes and spending cuts. >> spain is desperately trying to avoid becoming the next country to accept a full sovereign bailout. the deputy prime minister announced the budget in madrid, saying the most important portion of the budget was social spending. but despite the cuts, there will be increases to pensions and university scholarships. well, agrees needs to cut 12 million euros in spending if it wants more international money -- greece needs to cut 12 million euros. leaders got down to business and reached a basic agreement on a fres round of austerity measures. >> the budget talks come as strikes and demonstrations continued in athens and other parts of greece. the protests have broad public support with virtually everyone affected from students and pensioners to those in need of ongoing medical assistance. >> hundreds of disabled greeks came to athens from across the country to tell the government not to cut their benefits. they say current average payments barely meet their basic needs. >> the disabled
officers. protesters are angry at the cuts in pay and increases in taxis and blame the government and eu institutions for what they call unjust measures -- protesters are angry at the cuts in pay and increases in taxes. correspondent miles johnson is following events in madrid. massive protests today in spain -- why are people taking to the streets in such large numbers? >> i think we have now had months of austerity, but i think there is a growing sign that these austere measures often, in the form of numbers, as people read in the newspapers. >> it appears pretty clear that spain needs help, but the spanish government seems to still be very hesitant to formally ask for eu help. why is that? >> we have a bit of a stalemate at the moment. i think the political stigma, which is attached to requesting a bailout, which would really involve the prime minister going on television in front of his voters and saying, "i have failed" because he was elected in november to avoid this sort of state, but there is a political stigma attached meaning that he is very unlikely to order one unless he is f
, the general strike in greece -- the first one since the new government took power this summer, has brought much of greece to a standstill this wednesday. >> a diverse range of workers are taking part, from doctors to air traffic controllers. banks, schools, and shops are all closed, and public transportation has been shut down. a 24-hour walkout is to protest the latest round of spending cuts of more than 11 billion euros. 3000 police have been deployed to central athens. >> the main square of athens was a battleground again. a group of young demonstrators set garbage alight and threw molotov cocktails at police. officers hit back, dispersing the crowd. demonstrators fled. the protests started peacefully with tens of thousands of people showing up. the unions who organized the all greek workers. millions live in athens, but on wednesday morning, the streets were quiet. shopkeepers pulled down their shutters. railway workers walked off the job. the top national earner, the shipping industry, stood still. unionists had spent days had prepared for the rally, complaining that a steer the cuts
necessities to more than double over the last ten months. >> translator: the government says it will cut the price of meat, but it's still expensive. >> translator: i can't get by because of the high inflation. >> reporter: iran is also under international military pressure. israel has previously launched preemptive strikes on neighboring countries it suspects of planning to build nuclear weapons. the united states and other nations are staging what some has called the largest ever joint military drill in the persian gulf. but ahmadinejad said there's still room for diplomatic negotiations. >> translator: our negotiating stance has been if western countries provide us with 20% enriched uranium, we have no intention of producing it. we have presented many proposals to western kocountriecountries. i hope they will remain at the negotiating table. >> reporter: iran's president says he's open to talks on the nuclear issue. western leaders say he's just trying to buy time. ahmadinejad is scheduled to speak to the u.n. on wednesday. it will be his last general chance to impair the recovery. nh
, nausea, their eyes are watering. >> while george w. bush was president, the government changed some of the laws that protected the nation's drinking water. >> ♪ so it all goes back to 2005 ♪ ♪ bush said gas drillers didn't have to comply ♪ ♪ with the safe drinking water act ♪ ♪ before too long it was "frack, baby frack" ♪ ♪ until the break of dawn >> with fracking that's not properly regulated comes another threat -- the release of toxic gas into the air. >> so, on top of the drinking water being contaminated and undrinkable, the air is also posing a serious health problem, as well. >> alex is from the environmental working group. they want to prevent pollution. rachel works for a company that represents the gas industry. they want to help america benefit from an important source of fuel. both sides probably agree on one thing... >> ♪ now, it's not that drillers should never be fracking ♪ ♪ but the current regulation is severely lacking ♪ ♪ reduce the toxins, contain the gas and wastewater ♪ ♪ and the people won't get sick ♪ ♪ and the planet won't
have plagued the relationship. the japanese government's nationalization of the senkaku islands earlier this month triggered the worst falling out in years. china claimed the territory. chinese express their anger by holding large demonstrations. some crowds damaged japanese supermarkets and factories. the civil and political attention prompted both people in both countries to scrap ceremonies marking diplomat relations. delegates attending the assembly in new york watched the tensions simmer all week. diplomats from both countries show the world they were a long way off from finding common ground. >> translator: the islands are inherently chinese territory and there is indisputable historical evidence tho demonstrate this fact. japan stole them in 1985 at the end of the japanese war. >> chinese foreign minister chi called the nationalization a unilateral action that grossly violates china's sovereignty. he said it constitutes a grave challenge to the international order and to the u.n. charter. reply to refute china's claim. >> from 1885, surveys of the senkaku islands has been conduct
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)